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In-Person Workshops Registration Information

This year, in-person workshops will be held during the Annual Meeting, onsite, in Seattle, WA. To learn about the individual workshop offerings, scroll down or use the navigation menu on the left.

Only in-person Annual Meeting registrants can attend in-person workshops.

To purchase Annual Meeting registration and to reserve your space at a workshop, log in or create an account in the AAA Community Hub.

To add a workshop to your existing Annual Meeting registration, log in to the AAA Community Hub. Select Upcoming Events -> 2022 Annual Meeting: Unsettling Landscapes -> Manage Registration -> Edit Existing.

The workshop capacities are limited. Secure your spot today!

Wednesday, November 09

Engaged and Engaging Anthropology for People, Forests, Climate

4:30 PM to 6:15 PM

FREE

Tropical forest conservation can provide up to 1/3 of our collective climate change solutions, yet anthropological engagement in forest and climate spaces—from international organizations to funding agencies to local, community-level stakeholders—is both complex as well as dynamic. How can anthropologist work better with international organizations, NGOs, and donors to study and illuminate what is working—and notworking—in institutional attempts to address climate change through forest conservation? How can anthropologists (and allies) address issues of power, justice, participation, and voice as they strive to “study up” (Nader 1972)? What is our role as observers, as participants, as stakeholders, we study and engage with institutions and processes that have an incredible amount of the power to make globally significant decisions?

The purpose of this session is to engage rising anthropologists (students) as well as practicing anthropologists and academics working in the forest and climate space in focused discussions on what type of research and engagement is needed most in international forest conservation and climate spheres. The workshop will be divided into two parts:

(1)First, we will learn about the perspectives of anthropologists and practitioners working within international organizations with the goal of demystifying “what they think is most needed” for timely research as well as the practice of anthropology within these spaces.

We will have brief (10 minute) presentations followed by 5 minutes of question and answer with the following professionals*:

a) Food and Agriculture Organization (Focus: Forest Conservation, Restoration, and Adaptation)

b) The Tenure Facility or Nia Tero (Focus: Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities)

c) The Moore Foundation OR the Climate and Land Use Alliance (CLUA) OR the Ford Foundation (Focus: International Funding Mechanisms for People and Forests)

d) The United Nations Development Programme (Focus: UNFCCC Process)

*The organizer of this workshop has professional and personal relationships with each of the presenters noted above and has already reached out about their participation in this workshop if it is approved. They will participate via Zoom for their speaking slots and Q&A time.

(2)After this opening portion, we will divide into (up to four)breakout groups according to the focus areas in #1 above to have more targeted exploration of each of these perspectives. Workshop participants will (a) bring their own research and work into this discussion;(b) have dedicated time to begin to craft possible future research directions; and (c) gain feedback and insight from fellow participants on both (a) and (b).

This workshop will be interdisciplinary in nature, focusing on the broad themes of people, forests, climate as well as the four focus areas noted above. It will also explore the various approaches that can be taken in studying these themes and focus areas, as well as the role of both research as well as the practice of anthropology within global organizations and institutions. Finally, we will produce a summary of recommendations for each of the four themes and the breakout sessions that will be circulated to workshop participants after the session as well as shared with relevant AAA groups (Anthropology and the Environment, Climate Change).

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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Thursday, November 10

Grant Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the NSF

10:15 AM to 12:00 PM

FREE

Danilyn Rutherford, the president of the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and Jeff Mantz & Siobhán Mattison, Program Directors for Cultural Anthropology at the National Science Foundation, will offer a workshop designed to help anthropologists navigate the process of getting a grant. They’ll describe the various funding opportunities their agencies offer, say something about the review process, and offer helpful tips on how to write a winning proposal. There will be plenty of time for questions. This event will be suitable for students and seasoned scholars alike.

Proposal writing can be a daunting and even frightening task. Participants in this workshop will discover what the two major funders for anthropological research are looking for in an application. This workshop is perfect for anyone who wants to learn to describe their research in more compelling terms.

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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That Almost Finished Journal Article: A Writing Workshop

Part I: November 10th 2:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Part II: November 11th 2:00 PM to 6:00 PM

Workshop Registration Rate: $90.00
The registration price for this workshop includes access to both parts.

Many junior academics are intimidated by the peer review process or uncertain how to revise their manuscripts in response to reviewers’ and editors’ comments. Once they’ve finished their degree, they often become isolated at their new institutions and no longer have mentors to turn to for advice on their works-in-progress. This workshop fills in some of the experiential gaps in their professional development by providing explicit guidelines on producing manuscripts that will get forwarded to peer review and require minimal revision after acceptance for publication, thus shortening the time to publication.

Designed for junior professors, post-docs, graduate students (ABD), and international scholars seeking publication in English-language journals, this 8hour interactive writing workshop(spread across two days)provides guidelines and feedback to assist researchers in anthropology and related fields in revising and submitting articles for peer review. The facilitator first discusses strategies for steady output, demystifies peer review, and explains how to structure articles that draw on ethnographic and other qualitative data. The facilitator then leads participants through active learning exercises in which they analyze components of their drafts to check that they have a conceptual hook and clear point, signposts and transitions guiding readers through their argument, links between data and analysis, and a solid conclusion. Supplementary materials include14 pages of handouts with checklists for manuscript preparation and model passages from published articles. Each participant should bring at least one print copy of a draft of an article that they are planning to submit to a journal; parts of their draft will be shared with a partner during the workshop exercises.

For more information, contact Dr. Jaida Samudra (jaidasamudra@gmail.com), an anthropologist with over two decades experience editing journal articles and scholarly books in the social sciences.

Comments from past participants:

“A structural approach to manuscript production I have not previously encountered.”

“Most academics learn these things through trial and error (or trial by fire). A step-by-step insight into the process, pitfalls, and strategies associated with academic publication is an invaluable addition to the training of any burgeoning academic.”

“Got me thinking about an old, unfinished article again. Gave me hope that I can wrapthis up and get it submitted.”

“Fantastic workshop! The 8-hour timeframe was perfect -we could really ask questions and get deeply into the essential aspects for each of the sections of the journal article. The workshop was really well organized and the information was presented in an engaging and clear way.”

“Strength is hands-on approach: mixing theory about how to write and then being able to practice and apply it to my own writing.”

“Jaida created a collaborative and encouraging environment for working and asking questions.”

“The advice was practical, informative, and explained in a manner that was clear and easy to implement. The session provided participants with opportunities to practice applying the strategies taught. The handouts were useful in distilling the key lessons. The speaker was approachable and responsive to participants’ needs and preferences, and skillfully created a learning community among the participants. Five stars.”

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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How to Write for the Public

2:00 PM to 3:45 PM

FREE

Purpose and Objectives: Increasingly, anthropologists are seeking ways to connect their research, discoveries, and thinking to a broad, public audience. But how? This workshop brings together experts to provide insights into the art and craft of public engagement. Chip Colwell, editor-in-chief of Sapiens and Jeff Martin, the AAA’s Director of Communications and Public Affairs, will explain the importance of storytelling and how to write for the public. Workshop participants will learn how to master storytelling techniques that speak to the heart as well as the head, and position yourself as a trusted resource, both with the media and in communities. Participants will also learn how to write for SAPIENS and other public outlets, as you will learn how to build a framework to approach popular writing and an understanding of the publication process. We will close the workshop with a practice “pitch” session, where you get to try out turning your research into a clear, compelling story that will resonate with a general audience. Public engagement is a craft that must be cultivated, so please come join us to sharpen your skills and learn about how you can engage a broad public audience to make your research matter.

Intended Audiences: Anthropologists and allied scholars—students, professionals, and professors

Advancing Professional Interests: Communicating effectively with publics is vital to the discipline’s impact and future.

Supplemental Materials: PPT of workshop and online writing tools available on SAPIENS.

Active Learning Techniques: The workshop includes numerous opportunities for engagement and experimentation.

Attracting Audiences Outside Anthropology: The tools provided in this workshop apply to any social science, science, or humanities field.

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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Friday, November 11th

Teaching Intro to Cultural Anthropology

10:15 AM to 12:00 PM

Registration Rate: $20.00

Undergraduate students enrolled in introductory cultural anthropology courses, both majors and non-majors, comprise our discipline’s largest public audience. Anthropology’s dynamic toolkit of research strategies and analytical frameworks is increasingly relevant for students living in multicultural contexts in a globalizing world. How do we make anthropology come alive for today’s undergraduates? This interactive teaching workshop, for faculty at all levels, will explore effective strategies for engaging undergraduates, including consideration of teaching in the online environment.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participant will be able to…

  1. discuss concept of deep learning and why introduction to cultural anthropology may be the most important class a student takes in college
  2. enhance opportunities for experiential learning and scaffolded writing assignments in the classroom
  3. enhance strategies for classroom engagement, including online

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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That Almost Finished Journal Article: A Writing Workshop Part II

2:00 PM to 6:00 PM

Registration Rate: $90.00

The registration price for this workshop includes access to both parts.

Many junior academics are intimidated by the peer review process or uncertain how to revise their manuscripts in response to reviewers’ and editors’ comments. Once they’ve finished their degree, they often become isolated at their new institutions and no longer have mentors to turn to for advice on their works-in-progress. This workshop fills in some of the experiential gaps in their professional development by providing explicit guidelines on producing manuscripts that will get forwarded to peer review and require minimal revision after acceptance for publication, thus shortening the time to publication.

Designed for junior professors, post-docs, graduate students (ABD), and international scholars seeking publication in English-language journals, this 8hour interactive writing workshop(spread across two days)provides guidelines and feedback to assist researchers in anthropology and related fields in revising and submitting articles for peer review. The facilitator first discusses strategies for steady output, demystifies peer review, and explains how to structure articles that draw on ethnographic and other qualitative data. The facilitator then leads participants through active learning exercises in which they analyze components of their drafts to check that they have a conceptual hook and clear point, signposts and transitions guiding readers through their argument, links between data and analysis, and a solid conclusion. Supplementary materials include14 pages of handouts with checklists for manuscript preparation and model passages from published articles. Each participant should bring at least one print copy of a draft of an article that they are planning to submit to a journal; parts of their draft will be shared with a partner during the workshop exercises.

For more information, contact Dr. Jaida Samudra(jaidasamudra@gmail.com),an anthropologist with over two decades experience editing journal articles and scholarly books in the social sciences.

Comments from past participants:

“A structural approach to manuscript production I have not previously encountered.”

“Most academics learn these things through trial and error (or trial by fire). A step-by-step insight into the process, pitfalls, and strategies associated with academic publication is an invaluable addition to the training of any burgeoning academic.”

“Got me thinking about an old, unfinished article again. Gave me hope that I can wrapthis up and get it submitted.”

“Fantastic workshop! The 8-hour timeframe was perfect -we could really ask questions and get deeply into the essential aspects for each of the sections of the journal article. The workshop was really well organized and the information was presented in an engaging and clear way.”

“Strength is hands-on approach: mixing theory about how to write and then being able to practice and apply it to my own writing.”

“Jaida created a collaborative and encouraging environment for working and asking questions.”

“The advice was practical, informative, and explained in a manner that was clear and easy to implement. The session provided participants with opportunities to practice applying the strategies taught. The handouts were useful in distilling the key lessons. The speaker was approachable and responsive to participants’ needs and preferences, and skillfully created a learning community among the participants. Five stars.”

One registration gives you access to both parts

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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Gamer’s Workshop, Pandemic Edition

2:00 PM to 6:00 PM

FREE

From Bateson’s and Mead’s “Democracies and Dictators” to Tsing’s and Pollman’s “Global Futures”, anthropologists have long taken an interest in designing games that tell stories about anthropological ideas. Games have become even more important in the age of pandemic, with game platforms enabling social interaction at a distance. Here, games joined other multimodal tools in fieldwork sites that incorporated digital interactions and relationships into the geographies of anthropological place. In this workshop, we will look to these diverse platforms, including table-top games (that can be played using virtual tabletop software), GM-less games, single-player games, augmented reality, journaling and play-by-mail games. Games can be used to understand power, politics and socialities through a participatory ethos that can interrogate the power and inequalities of the anthropological encounter .Moreover, the experiential and empathetic qualities of games can be a powerful medium for learning, and we will engage gaming from a variety of perspectives, culminating in game design and play-testing. After being introduced to basics in game design, participants will design in situ games that take participants beyond the conference hall to sites in Seattle. Panelists will discuss and analyze how the narratives and mechanics of games convey meaning and engage players in a worldview. Since many popular games are based on colonial and Eurocentric premises, we will invite participants to reimagine, “hack”, and decolonize games. Finally, we will prototype and play-test the games produced in the workshop, as well as other anthro-inspired games and arcade games, during #AnthropologyCon IV. For more information on the events taking place at #AnthropologyCon IV, visit: www.anthropologycon.org.

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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Saturday, November 12

Translating Anthropological Knowledge to Practice in Medical Education: Strategies for Effective Teaching

8:00 AM to 9:45 AM

Registration Rate: $20.00

This workshop is designed for anthropologists engaged in medicine and other health profession education who wish to develop frameworks and concrete learning strategies for more effective teaching by translating theoretical and ethnographic knowledge into clinical contexts. It will also be of interest to those from other fields engaged in teaching behavioral and social foundations to current and future physicians. This workshop will also enhance knowledge and skills of anthropology graduate students who desire work in medical education to address some of the challenges presented in engaging with the culture of medicine, translating anthropological knowledge and being effective educators in medicine and the health professions. On completion of this workshop, participants will know how to: 1) identify challenges faced by anthropologists teaching in clinical fields; 2) describe effective strategies for teaching anthropological perspectives in medicine and other health professions; 3) develop relevant learning objectives and materials for translating anthropological knowledge to practice.

Faculty content experts will use a combination of brief lectures and small group activities to enable participants to create teaching materials based on their own settings and learning outcomes. The workshop will be divided into two parts. First, participants will hear brief presentations by content experts. In the second part, participants will be divided into small groups led by expert faculty (listed below) to learn these techniques, to discuss their specific learning objectives and start developing their own teaching materials. Participants will have access to topic-specific materials developed by the faculty experts and be connected to others teaching in medicine.

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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Connecting Ethnographic Methods, Culture, and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Work in Organizations

10:15 AM to 12:00 PM

Free

As conducting cultural assessments has become a critical aspect of organizations’ diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) strategies, understanding organizational culture is increasingly an important component of DEI work. In this environment, competing understandings of what culture is and how it operates, both within and outside of the organization, can critically impact the success of DEI efforts. During this session, students and potential jobseekers will be provided with illustrative case studies and led through hands-on activities that seek to hone their ability to apply ethnographic theory and methods to cultural assessment and DEI work in organizations. Specifically, small group exercises are designed to teach attendees how to articulate the differences between diversity, equity, and inclusion in-practice, to ethnographically assess organizational values, and to apply a DEI lens to the remaking and institutionalization of these newly created values within an organization. Attendees will leave the workshop with a better understanding of how ethnographic research can contribute to the development of impactful DEI strategies and outcomes.

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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Going Up? Creating and Delivering the Perfect Elevator Pitch

10:15 AM to 12:00 PM

Free

You bump into an old acquaintance, or your former boss, and she asks you what you’re up to. Will you stutter, sputter and stammer? Or will you smile and deliver the perfect “elevator pitch” –a brief, persuasive synopsis that you use to spark interest in you—or a career-related idea you have. A good elevator pitch should last no longer than a short elevator ride of 20 to 30 seconds, hence the name. By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Tailor it to your audience
  • Make your pitch interesting, memorable, and succinct
  • Communicate your unique selling proposition well
  • Relay exactly who you are, where your interests lay, and how you plan to add value.

After a brief introduction and overview, we will break into groups, write our own pitches, and then practice them before the other attendees. First, we will focus on your content and then we will focus on your ability to deliver your pitch. Our goal is to help you communicate effectively and with confidence. You will be able to put this skill to work right away with prospective(or current)employer or anyone else you hope to influence through your work. You will leave the workshop with a one-page tool that will help you continue practicing your pitch. This workshop is open to students, early-career professionals, and those seeking a career reset—regardless of disciplinary background. The training is general enough that anyone intent on finding work should be able to benefit from it. See you there!

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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Publishing with American Ethnologist

4:15 PM to 6:00 PM

Registration Rate: $20.00

Two members of the new editorial team of American Ethnologist, Susanna Trnka (Editor-in-Chief) and Lisa Wynn (Associate Editor) will present on the theme of ethnographic writing. Participants will learn about how to craft a empirically-rich and conceptually-provocative journal article, suitable for a journal such as American Ethnologist. While the focus will be on writing, we will necessarily address issues such as gathering appropriate fieldwork material, the ethics of representation, positionality and self-reflexivity, and the role of publication as part of long- and short-term career strategies.

The intended audience is junior academics and PhD students though other students are welcome to attend. The session will be of interest to academics who practice ethnographically-informed research, including, but not limited to, anthropologists.

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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Asking Anthropological Questions with Big Data: An introduction to IPUMS data repository analysis using R

4:15 PM to 6:00 PM

FREE

This workshop is intended to introduce anthropologists to the IPUMS data collection. IPUMS provides individual-level census and survey data from around the world, integrated across time and space, as a free resource for scientific research. The first half of this workshop will discuss the topics and themes covered by IPUMS data, describe the types of harmonized variables available, and demonstrate how to create a data extract request. The second half will cover a range of topics, including: working with IPUMS data in R, anthropological research applications, and using IPUMS as a classroom resource. This workshop is suited for students, educators, and researchers of all levels interested in using census and survey data in their classrooms or their research.

Access to data is a persistent problem for many anthropologists from students to seasoned scholars. These limitations have only been made worse by pandemic precautions. IPUMS data has been used in thousands of publications to date, and cover a range of topics including basic demographics, fertility and mortality, migration, and labor force. Most IPUMS collections provide person-level data allowing anthropologists to look directly at individual variation as well as population-level data. Summarized IPUMS variables, including some environmental data, are also available along with harmonized GIS shapefiles. The IPUMS data collection provides an ideal repository for individuals seeking to study modern variation in a variety of social-science variables. Pre-register for workshop materials, walk-ins welcome, laptops not required.

Spaces are limited. Register for this workshop today!

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