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Collective Access as a Presenter

All annual meeting presenters, whether in-person or virtual, are strongly encouraged to join us in supporting collective access (a term by Mia Mingus and Sins Invalid).

While preparing for your session during the 2022 AAA Annual Meeting, please review this page so that you learn more about the accessible practices needed and recommended during the meeting. This page outlines the practices and links to other pages that provide specific tips, tricks, and tools for how to incorporate these practices, and must be considered following the acceptance of your proposal when uploading your materials to the 2022 AAA Annual Meeting Speaker Resource Center and during your session.

 

All presentation documents and materials must be submitted in the Speaker Resource Center by Wednesday, September 14, 2022 – 11:59 PM ET.

 

Interactive Table of Contents

What do I need to prepare for my session?

 

Review needed presentation materials in the
2022 Presenter Materials Table Excel Sheet!

 

The same downloadable document can be reviewed in table format below. If you are a screen-reader user or otherwise do not benefit from tables, skip the table to select what session type your are presenting, which will direct you to more information about needed features for your presentation.

Presentation Type Modality List of Terms with Outline Accessible Introductions Speak Slowly Visual Descriptions Accessible Slides/Poster/PDF Transcript
Individual Individually Volunteered Paper Presentation In-Person & Virtual Needed Needed Needed Needed Needed if planned to use Not applicable
Flash Presentation In-Person Only Needed Needed Needed Needed Needed if planned to use Not applicable
In-Person Poster In-Person Only Not applicable Needed Needed Needed Needed Not applicable
Virtual Poster Virtual Only Not applicable Needed Needed Needed Needed Needed
Virtual Talk Virtual Only Not applicable Needed Needed Needed Needed if planned to use Needed
 
Group Oral Presentation Session In-Person & Virtual Needed Needed Needed Needed Needed if planned to use Not applicable
Roundtable / Town Hall In-Person & Virtual Needed Needed Needed Needed Needed if planned to use Not applicable
Conversation or Debate In-Person & Virtual Needed Needed Needed Needed Needed if planned to use Not applicable
Interview In-Person & Virtual Needed Needed Needed Needed Needed if planned to use Not applicable
Podcast Virtual Only Not applicable Needed Needed Needed Not applicable Needed

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Select the type of session you are presenting to learn what you need to do and prepare to support collective access as a presenter.

I am presenting…

 

All presentation documents and materials must be submitted in the Speaker Resource Center by Wednesday, September 14, 2022 – 11:59 PM ET.

 

Accessibility Support – Check Back Soon!

Do you have questions or need clarification about how you can best support collective access in your presentation? The AAA Meetings Team will be providing a new form of support for all meeting presenters to prepare your presentations in an accessible manner. Whether you plan to join us for the Annual Meeting in Seattle or online, you will have another way to learn about our accessibility requirements, recommendations, and what resources are available to help you prepare all your materials and host the most accessible session possible. Check back on this page for more information by the end of July!

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Recommended Speaker Tasks Benchmarks

AAA understands that some of these tasks may be new to Annual Meeting Speakers. To help AAA Annual Meeting Speakers complete their speaker tasks, the AAA Meetings Team has developed recommended speaker tasks benchmarks. These benchmarks provide an outline that breaks down the time that speakers and organizers have into weeks and days, from the moment when you receive your presentation/session acceptance notices to the presentation materials due date on Wednesday, September 14, 2022. We hope that these benchmarks may be a helpful tool to you and your co-panelists as you develop a planned work flow that supports the inclusion of accessibility into the preparation of your AAA Annual Meeting session!

You may view these benchmarks in numbered-bullet point Word document and Excel sheet formats.

The Word document has an interactive table of contents that allows you to navigate to the session type you are preparing for, whether as a speaker or organizer, and the Excel sheet provides a breakdown on two sheets based on whether you are presenting in a Group Session or as an Individual.

You may also view and add the tasks to your Outlook and/or Google calendars, based on your session type, using the links below:

 

Accessibility Features for Live (In-Person or Virtual) Group Sessions

All live group sessions require speakers to prepare their material in advance to offer access copies through the virtual platform and to also support ASL interpreters and CART captioners. We also remind speakers to utilize accessible practices throughout their sessions.

 

All live group session presentation documents and materials must be submitted in the Speaker Resource Center by Wednesday, September 14, 2022 – 11:59 PM ET.

 

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Which session types are considered live group sessions?

  1. Oral Presentation Sessions (including those made of individually volunteered papers) (In-Person AND Virtual)
    • Session Length: 105 minutes for entire panel
    • Maximum Time per Presenter: 15 minutes per paper presentation or discussant
  2. Roundtables/Town Halls (In-Person AND Virtual)
    • Session Length: 105 minutes for entire panel
  3. Conversations or Debates (In-Person AND Virtual)
    • Session Length: 105 minutes for entire conversation/debate
  4. Interviews (In-Person AND Virtual)
    • Session Length:105 minutes for entire interview

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Needed Features for Live Group Sessions

  1. List of Terms with Session Outline as an accessible Word document
    • Why? A list of terms helps support CART captioners, ASL interpreters, and others who may need support with language. An outline of your session supports CART captioners, ASL interpreters, and others who may need support with processing content.
  2. Accessible introductions of all speakers
    • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
  3. Avoid speed talking/reading
    • Why? Speed talking/reading makes it difficult for a variety of people to follow a presentation and understand the most critical information you want them to leave with.
  4. Announcement of each speaker prior to speaking (i.e. “This is Ed.” “Nate speaking.”)
    • Why? Announcements prior to speaking helps people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, blind, low-vision, or have an auditory processing disorder more easily follow the conversation.
  5. Visual description of relevant visual moments
    • What are “relevant visual moments”? Relevant visual moments are moments in which the visual during the video changes.
      • This may be something such as you as the speaker lifting up a model of an artifact and describing the artifact (e.g. “I am now holding up to the camera a model of a skull of an Australopithecus afarensis. The skull is narrow and includes a smaller neurocranium, or braincase. There are also large canines visible and the jaw juts out forward. The parts of the model which indicate having been found are in a rough texture, whereas the rest of the model is a smooth plastic.”)
      • Alternatively, this may also include a complete change in scenery. (e.g. “I am now walking outside, wearing a mask, on a beautiful sunny day, and the green lawns of the university campus surround me on either side of the walkway. Three people may be seen walking in a group at a distance wearing masks.” or “A scene pans to the front podium of an otherwise empty classroom. The black chalkboard includes in writing “2019 Words of the Year” underlined, followed by a list: (my) pronouns, they, quid pro quo, ok boomer, and I oop-, nobody, people of means, im [drawing of a peach].”
    • Why? Visual descriptions helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals, gain access to the visuals of the video.
  6. If slides are used: Accessible slides provided in advance in PPT and/or PDF format
    • Note: PPT can be checked for accessibility using the “Accessibility Checker” feature. PDF must be confirmed for accessibility using Acrobat Pro.
    • Why? Developing accessible slides helps people who use screen reader; are blind, low-vision, or colorblind; and who need visuals that are not overwhelming and easy to follow.

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Accessibility Features for Individual In-Person Sessions

All live individual sessions require speakers to prepare their material in advance to offer access copies through the virtual platform. We also remind speakers to utilize accessible practices throughout their sessions.

 

All individual in-person presentation documents and materials must be submitted in the Speaker Resource Center by Wednesday, September 14, 2022 – 11:59 PM ET.

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Which session types are considered individual in-person sessions?

  1. Flash Presentation Sessions (In-Person)
    • Maximum Time per Presenter: 5 minutes
    • Session Length: 105 minutes
  2. In-Person Posters (In-Person)
    • Session Length: 105 minutes, presenters can engage with attendees at their posters throughout this time

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Needed Features for Individual In-Person Sessions

  1. Visual descriptions practices when referencing and discussing visuals on your slides or the poster
    • Why? Describing visuals, such as graphs, maps, pictures, cartoons, etc., and reading text on your slides or poster helps support people who are blind or low-vision, who have a visual processing disorder, or who better process information through verbal explanations of visuals gain access to the visuals of the poster.
  2. Accessible slides/poster and PDF (PDF must be confirmed for accessibility using Acrobat Pro) – these will be shared on the virtual platform
    • Why? Developing accessible slides/posters helps people who use screen readers; are blind, low-vision, or colorblind; and who need visuals that are not overwhelming and easy to follow.

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Recommended Features for Individual In-Person Sessions

  1. A QR code or short link to direct people to a digital access copy of your slides or poster
    • Why? Providing a QR code or short link can help guide people who use a screen reader to a version they can engage with outside of the physical presentation space.

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Accessibility Features for All View-on-Demand Sessions

All view-on-demand sessions are required to fulfill the accessibility features listed below. Please note that if you do not fulfill these expectations, your submission will not be included in the view-on-demand events library.

 

All view-on-demand presentation documents and materials must be submitted in the Speaker Resource Center by Wednesday, September 14, 2022 – 11:59 PM ET.

 

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Which session types are considered view-on-demand sessions?

  1. Podcasts (Virtual)
    • Maximum Recording Time: 40 minutes
  2. Virtual Posters (Virtual)
    • Maximum Recording Time: 10 minutes
  3. Talks (Virtual)
    • Maximum Recording Time: 20 minutes

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Needed Features for View-on-Demand Sessions

  1. Transcript
    • Why? A transcript ensures that people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, DeafBlind, or have an auditory processing disorder are able to engage with the audio of your recording.
  2. Avoid speed talking/reading
    • Why? Speed talking/reading makes it difficult for a variety of people to follow a presentation and understand the most critical information you want them to leave with.
  3. If slides are used:
    1. Accessible slide(s) and PDF (PDF must be confirmed for accessibility using Acrobat Pro.)
      • Why? Developing accessible slides helps people who use screen reader; are blind, low-vision, or colorblind; and who need visuals that are not overwhelming and easy to follow.
    2. Visual description practices when referencing and discussing visuals on your slides or poster
      • Why? Describing visuals, such as graphs, maps, pictures, cartoons, etc., and reading text on the slide helps support people who are blind or low-vision, who have a visual processing disorder, or who better process information through verbal explanations of visuals gain access to the visuals of the poster.
  4. If video (of the speaker or surroundings) is used:
    1. Accessible introduction
      • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
    2. Visual description of relevant visual moments
      • What are “relevant visual moments”? Relevant visual moments are moments in which the visual during the video changes.
        • This may be something such as you as the speaker lifting up a model of an artifact and describing the artifact (e.g. “I am now holding up to the camera a model of a skull of an Australopithecus afarensis. The skull is narrow and includes a smaller neurocranium, or braincase. There are also large canines visible and the jaw juts out forward. The parts of the model which indicate having been found are in a rough texture, whereas the rest of the model is a smooth plastic.”)
        • Alternatively, this may also include a complete change in scenery. (e.g. “I am now walking outside, wearing a mask, on a beautiful sunny day, and the green lawns of the university campus surround me on either side of the walkway. Three people may be seen walking in a group at a distance wearing masks.” or “A scene pans to the front podium of an otherwise empty classroom. The black chalkboard includes in writing “2019 Words of the Year” underlined, followed by a list: (my) pronouns, they, quid pro quo, ok boomer, and I oop-, nobody, people of means, im [drawing of a peach].”
      • Why? Visual descriptions helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals, gain access to the visuals of the video.

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Recommended Features for View-on-Demand Sessions

  1. A reminder for the audience to find digital access copies on the 2022 AAA Annual Meeting virtual platform
    • Why? People who need additional time to review content or who use a screen reader can then access your presentation materials in their own time and engage with it at their own pace.

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Important Final Reminders

A few reminders to keep in mind include:

  1. List of terms for all live sessions are required to support our access provider teams. This allows them to share your important work in an accurate and meaningful way.
  2. If submitting slides, we do encourage you to provide slides that are nearly, if not completely, finalized.
    1. If you know you plan to provide more specifics to your slides at a later time, instead of providing finalized slides, instead please provide a framework for your deck at a minimum. These slides can each have a topic and be simple white slides with black text, and ultimately, they should not change in order if you do choose to update them prior to the meeting.
    2. For guidance on how to prepare your slides for the meeting, please review Dr. Cassandra Hartblay’s Tweet Thread/Primer: How to Make a Slideshow for your Conference Presentation Before Writing Your PresentationUnrolled Version on Threadreader
  3. Importantly, finalized, written papers are not required. However, if you do complete your paper by the September 14, 2022, deadline, we invite you to submit your paper in addition to the list of terms so that the access provider team and other attendees may engage with your material through the access copies to be uploaded onto the website.

Questions?

If you have any questions about these collective access practices for presenters, please reach out to the AAA Accessibility & Meetings Manager through our Contact Form!

Ask about Accessibility!

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